Android phone activity tracking

 

Rooting is the process of allowing users of smartphones , tablets and other devices running the Android mobile operating system to attain privileged control (known as root access ) over various Android subsystems. As Android uses the Linux kernel , rooting an Android device gives similar access to administrative ( superuser ) permissions as on Linux or any other Unix-like operating system such as FreeBSD or OS X .

Rooting is often performed with the goal of overcoming limitations that carriers and hardware manufacturers put on some devices. Thus, rooting gives the ability (or permission) to alter or replace system applications and settings, run specialized applications ("apps") that require administrator-level permissions, or perform other operations that are otherwise inaccessible to a normal Android user. On Android, rooting can also facilitate the complete removal and replacement of the device's operating system, usually with a more recent release of its current operating system.

In contrast to iOS jailbreaking , rooting is not needed to run applications distributed outside of the Google Play Store, sometimes called sideloading . The Android OS supports this feature natively in two ways: through the "Unknown sources" option in the Settings menu and through the Android Debug Bridge . However, some US carriers , including AT&T , prevented the installation of applications not on the Play Store in firmware , [4] although several devices are not subject to this rule, including the Samsung Infuse 4G ; [5] AT&T lifted the restriction on most devices by the middle of 2011. [6]

Android phone activity tracking

MoDaCo team member Simon Lovejoy writes "The power of smart phone photography caught me by surprise really. After returning from a trip to New York I realised that almost all of my pictures were taken on my humble Moto G in glorious 5mp quality rather than the 14mp compact camera we took with us. The Moto was always right there when we needed it. So for a recent trip to Kenya and Zambia the question was what if we threw some more glory at the smart phone? Thanks to Huawei, I took the not even nearly humble Huawei P9 with its’ dual Leica lenses and 12mp sensors to find out."

Honor have this evening announced their new, dual camera, mid range champion, the Honor 6X. You know what that means? We've already started work on enthusiasts / developer tools for the device!

At CES in Las Vegas, Honor have today announced their latest smartphone release for the UK, Europe and the US - the £225 Honor 6X. The 5.5", full HD handset packs dual 12 Megapixel / 2 Megapixel cameras, 32GB ROM, 3GB RAM, a fingerprint reader and the Kirin 655 processor - a small update to the critically acclaimed Kirin 650 previously featured in the surprisingly snappy Honor 5C.

Rooting is the process of allowing users of smartphones , tablets and other devices running the Android mobile operating system to attain privileged control (known as root access ) over various Android subsystems. As Android uses the Linux kernel , rooting an Android device gives similar access to administrative ( superuser ) permissions as on Linux or any other Unix-like operating system such as FreeBSD or OS X .

Rooting is often performed with the goal of overcoming limitations that carriers and hardware manufacturers put on some devices. Thus, rooting gives the ability (or permission) to alter or replace system applications and settings, run specialized applications ("apps") that require administrator-level permissions, or perform other operations that are otherwise inaccessible to a normal Android user. On Android, rooting can also facilitate the complete removal and replacement of the device's operating system, usually with a more recent release of its current operating system.

In contrast to iOS jailbreaking , rooting is not needed to run applications distributed outside of the Google Play Store, sometimes called sideloading . The Android OS supports this feature natively in two ways: through the "Unknown sources" option in the Settings menu and through the Android Debug Bridge . However, some US carriers , including AT&T , prevented the installation of applications not on the Play Store in firmware , [4] although several devices are not subject to this rule, including the Samsung Infuse 4G ; [5] AT&T lifted the restriction on most devices by the middle of 2011. [6]

Android application components can connect to other Android applications. This connection is based on a task description represented by an Intent object.

Intents are asynchronous messages which allow application components to request functionality from other Android components. Intents allow you to interact with components from the same applications as well as with components contributed by other applications. For example, an activity can start an external activity for taking a picture.

Intents are objects of the android.content.Intent type. Your code can send them to the Android system defining the components you are targeting. For example, via the startActivity() method you can define that the intent should be used to start an activity.